10 yoga poses for beginners

 

 

If you are new to yoga, there are certain poses that you should learn to do correctly. Whether you plan on practicing at home or at a yoga studio, knowing the proper way to do each of these poses will help you feel more comfortable and get more benefits from your practice.

You can look at this as your very own program that you can do when you have time, gradually increasing the number of breaths that you hold each pose for, until you reach 10 breaths.

Selecting those poses was hard, since there are over 300 positions in the physical yoga (asana) practice. We wanted to pick the poses that can act, at least for a while, as a standalone yoga routine so that you gain some flexibility and strength.

Try to follow the instructions and don’t expect to get into the final pose right from the start. Listen to your body and don’t force anything. This is one of the great things about yoga, seeing where you were in the first days of practice compared to where you are at the moment. So just start.

 

The poses:

 

1. Mountain Pose

Mountain pose may seem like “simply standing,” but there is a ton going on. This pose teaches you to ground down from your feet and it’s the base for all standing poses, so don’t underestimate it.

 

How to do it:

     ● The body is in the standing position, with the feet together and rooted into the earth.

     ● The toes are actively lifted. The weight of the body is evenly distributed on the four corners of the feet.

     ● The pelvis is tucked. The ribcage is lifted.

     ● The neck is a natural extension of the spine and the chin is slightly tucked towards the sternum.

     ● The shoulders are relaxed as they rotate back and down.

     ● The gaze is forward.

 

 

2. Downward Facing Dog

Downward Dog, Down Dog for short is a pose that stretches and strengthens the entire body. It’s an essential to the majority of yoga sequences, regardless of the yoga style.

 

How to do it:

     ● The body is positioned in an inverted “V” with the palms and feet rooted into the earth and sits bones lifted up towards the sky.

     ● The arms and legs are straight.

     ● The weight of the body is equally distributed between the hands and the feet.

     ● The eye of the elbows face forward.

     ● The ribcage is lifted and the heart is open.

     ● Shoulders are squared to the earth and rotated back, down and inward.

     ● The neck is relaxed and the crown of the head is toward the earth.

     ● The gaze is down and slightly forward.

 

 

3. Plank

You may already know Plank from your previous workouts. It’s without a doubt a challenging pose, but it’s amazing for strengthening the abdominals, which in turn will help you get in more advanced poses. You can learn to use the breath to stay in this pose for longer.

 

How to do it:

     ● The body is parallel to the earth.

     ● The weight of the body is supported by straight arms and active toes.

     ● The abdomen is pulled up towards the spine and the pelvis is tucked in.

     ● The neck is a natural extension of the spine and the chin is slightly tucked.

     ● The palms are flat and the elbows are close to the side body.

     ● The joints are stacked with the wrists, elbows and shoulders in a straight line perpendicular to the earth.

     ● The gaze follows the spine and the eyes are focused down.

 

 

4. Triangle

Triangle is a wonderful standing posture to stretch strengthen your thighs, knees, ankles, and the sies of the body, relieving backache.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a standing position, the legs are straight and separated into a wide stance.

     ● The feet are aligned and flat on the earth with the back foot in a 60-degree angle towards the front.

     ● The inner thighs are rotated externally away from each other.

     ● The pelvis is tucked and the ribcage is lifted.

     ● One arm extends up towards the sky as the other reaches down to the earth.

     ● Both arms are aligned with the shoulders in a straight line.

     ● The fingers reach out as the shoulder blades squeeze together.

     ● The gaze is toward the front.

 

 

5. Tree

Tree is great for learning how to balance on one foot. It also strengthens the legs, ankles and feet.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a standing position, one foot is rooted into the earth with the opposite heel rooted into the inner thigh with the toes pointing towards the earth.

     ● The pelvis and the chin are tucked in.

     ● The arms are lifted above the head with the palms together in prayer position.

     ● The gaze is forward.

 

 

6. Warrior 1

Warrior poses are essential for building strength and stamina in a yoga practice. Warrior I gives us confidence by opening the chest and strengthening the back and the lower body.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a standing position, the legs are in a wide stance with the feet aligned and flat on the earth.

     ● The back foot is in a 60-degree angle towards the front.

     ● The hips are squared. The inner thighs are rotated towards each other.

     ● The front knee is bent in a 90-degree angle directly above the ankle.

     ● The arms extend up to the sky with the biceps by the ears.

     ● The hands can be together or separated and facing each other with the fingers spread wide.

     ● The ribcage is lifted and the pelvis tucked.

     ● The gaze is forward.

 

 

7. Warrior 2

Warrior 2works wonders for opening up the inner thighs and groin. It’s a good starting point for many side postures including triangle, extended angle and half moon balance.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a standing position, the legs are separated into a wide stance.

     ● The front knee is bent in a 90-degree angle directly above the ankle.

     ● The back leg is extended and straight with the outside edge of the back foot gripping the earth in a 60-degree angle towards the front.

     ● The inner thighs are externally rotated away from each other.

     ● The pelvis is tucked.

     ● The ribcage is lifted.

     ● The arms are extended out to the sides and are aligned with the shoulders in a straight line with the fingers reaching out as the shoulder blades squeeze together.

     ● The gaze is toward the front fingers.

 

 

8. Seated Forward Bend

It’s important to incorporate a forward bend in yoga practice to stretch the hamstrings, lower and upper back and sides. Don’t force your way into the pose. Stop at the sweet pain, don’t go all the way to the pain-pain.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a seated position with the sits bones rooted into the earth the legs extend forward to the degree that the chest and thighs can stay connected.

     ● The fingers wrap around the toes.

     ● The upper torso folds forward at the crease of the hips with the spine long.

     ● The gaze is forward.

 

 

9. Bridge Pose

This pose acts as a counter pose to a forward bend, as it is a back bend. Bridge is a good beginner’s back bend that stretches the front body and strengthens the back body.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a supine position, on your back, the hips are pressed up with the heels of the feet rooted into the earth close to the sits bones.

     ● The toes are actively lifted and the pelvis tucked.

     ● The thighs are parallel to the earth and the fingers are interlaced under the body with the ribcage lifted and the heart open.

     ● The back of the neck rests on the earth.

     ● The gaze is to the sky.

 

 

10. Child’s Pose

The ultimate resting pose. Although it may seem odd at first, you will quickly learn to love this soothing position. Use it to take a break in down dog if you are tired, in bed, before going to sleep or when you need a mental break.

 

How to do it:

     ● From a kneeling position, the toes and knees are together with most of the weight of the body resting on the heels of the feet.

     ● The arms are extended back resting alongside the legs.

     ● The forehead rests softly onto the earth.

     ● The gaze is down and inward.


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